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Your Eye Health

Learning about your eye health can be complicated - and might even seem overwhelming at first. Below you will find simplified information on the importance of protecting your eyes, common eye disease descriptions and how your vision changes with age.

Healthy Sight

When we’re talking about healthy sight, we’re really talking about the immediate, short and long-term care and protection of your vision—the sense that provides you with a unique and personal view of the world. So much of what we learn, what we experience, and what we enjoy comes to us through our eyes.

Healthy Sight isn’t a slogan; it’s a way of life that enhances your everyday vision while preserving the well being of your eyes. Eye health means wearing the correct prescription if corrective lenses or contacts are needed. It means knowing how to protect your eyes from glare, from the sun’s harmful UV rays, from the hazards of extreme activities. Having healthy eyes means understanding how lifestyle, diet and personal habits can affect the way you see—today and tomorrow.

Eye Diseases

Cataracts

Cataracts are a natural aging process in which the crystalline lens of the eye clouds over. Cataracts prevent clear images from appearing on the eye’s retina; causing mild, moderate, even severe blurred vision. Cataracts generally occur later in life as the lens structure within the human eye changes and gets older.

Glaucoma Testing & Treatment

Glaucoma is the generalized name for a group of eye diseases that damage the optic nerve of the eye, preventing the eye from sending accurate visual information to the brain. Glaucoma is much more predominant in the elderly, but it can occur at any age. In the vast majority of cases, there are no symptoms.

Macular Degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration presents itself in two forms: dry macular degeneration and wet macular degeneration. Of the two, the “dry” form is far more common. Both affect the center region of the retina, the light-sensitive area in the back of the eye responsible for processing images we see.

Macular degeneration symptoms include a gradual loss of central vision needed to perform everyday tasks like driving or reading, and a reduced ability to see small visual details like fine print or patterns.

Diabetes And Vision

Diabetes is a disease that affects the way we process food for energy and growth. With all forms of diabetes—type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes—the body has trouble converting sugar in the blood into energy, resulting in a host of potential health problems.

Diabetes increases the likelihood that common diabetes-related vision problems or diseases might occur:

That’s why there’s no separating diabetes and vision. If you have diabetes, then you should understand vision problems that increase in likelihood as a result of the disease.

Vision Over 40

If you are among the 85 million Baby Boomers in the United States and Canada (born between 1946 and 1964), you've probably noticed your eyes have changed. Most notably, presbyopia - the normal, age-related loss of near focusing ability - usually becomes a problem in our 40's, requiring new vision correction solutions. Speak with us today about measures you can take to keep seeing clearly for years to come.

Vision Over 60

Just as our physical strength decreases with age, our eyes also exhibit an age-related decline in performance - particularly as we reach our 60's and beyond. Some age-related eye changes are perfectly normal, but others may signal a disease process. It's important to recognize signs and symptoms, and perhaps even more important to mitigate the effects of aging with some simple and common-sense strategies. Speak with us today about signs, symptoms and management.